A Moment In History 2014

 
 

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"A People without knowledge of their Past History, origin and culture is like a Tree without Roots...."  Marcus Garvey

                                                                                                                                                             

Excellence and Education

Historical Black Colleges

In the late 19th century, colleges for black students were started in box cars, Atlanta University,  and church basements, Spelman College. Mary McLeod Bethune, one of the nation's foremost black educators, opened a college in 1904 with $1.50 and 5 students. Today, there are 101 historically black colleges and universities in the United States, who can count among their graduates such luminaries as W. E. B. Du Bois - Fisk University, Thurgood Marshall - Lincoln University & Howard University, Toni Morrison - Howard University, and Martin Luther King, Jr. - Morehouse College. There are 105 historically black universities and colleges, and the majority were created in the United States after the Civil War. The history of these historical black colleges and universities offer stories of courage, dedication, and commitment to the ideal of intellectual pursuit for all Americans.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities, HBCU,  are institutions of higher education in the United States that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the black community.  All are or were in the former slave states and territories of the U.S. except for Central State University - Ohio, Wilberforce University - Ohio, Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, Lewis College of Business - Detroit, Michigan, Lincoln University - Pennsylvania, and now-defunct Western University - Kansas.  Some closed during the 20th century due to competition, the Great Depression and financial difficulties after operating for decades. Of the 105 HBCU institutions in America today, 27 offer doctoral programs and 52 provide graduate degree programs at the Master's level.  At the undergraduate level, 83 of the HBCUs offer a Bachelor's degree program and 38 of these schools offer associate degrees.